Of Blogs And Men

BUILDING AN ONLINE PRESENCE FOR YOUR FILM & TV PROJECTS I blog. You blog. We all blog. It’s an undeniable fact: Web logs (to use the old-fashioned term) are now as relevant as major newspapers and magazines, supplying millions of readers worldwide with news, updates, and random pieces of information. When it comes to developing a project – whether it’s a film, a commercial, a viral video or a TV show – a blog can actually serve your process. It can help you to identify your audience and give them the opportunity to talk back (through comment feeds). Blogging about your project and the different stages it’s going through opens what I like to call the Door to Collaboration, a dynamic give-and-receive process that can help shape your idea into the Best Possible Product. If you have investors involved it’s a great way to maintain their excitement. A blog can keep them up to date on how the project is moving and offer them reassurance that their money is being used wisely. A blog can also stir up some buzz, create more awareness of your product and potentially generate more support. For writers, blogs can showcase their wit, style, and chops, and act as a kind of cyber calling card. A great blog can also show that you are a serious, professional scribe taking pride in your craft and not just a weekend hobbyist jotting down grammatically-incorrect, incoherent rants (Blogger’s note: if you wish to be taken seriously, be your own editor, proofread what you self-publish, and write as if you’re on assignment for a revered magazine or newspaper)....

$h*! MY PRODUCER SAYS

HOW THE TWITTER SENSATION BECAME A HOT PIECE OF PRIMETIME – NAT MUNDEL SITS DOWN WITH THE CO-EXECUTIVE PRODUCER OF CBS’ HIT TV SHOW, PATRICK SCHUMACKER. Before Twitter feed ShitMyDadSays broke out onto the social media scene two years ago, creator Justin Halpern was an editor at Maxim.com and Patrick Schumacker was a film and TV blogger for Screen Junkies at Break Media as well as a writer for Voyage Media.  Together, the two saw their project through book proposals (an integral part of the development process), feature-film prospects, and – in a rare instance of role reversal – pitches made by studio execs to networks. Find out what happens on the development road to network television as Patrick discusses what it was like to team up with a pair of producing veterans (Will & Grace‘s Max Mutchnick and David Kohan) to turn the immensely popular SMDS into a hot piece of primetime property. Archives April 2018 (1) March 2018 (1) February 2018 (1) January 2018 (1) December 2017 (1) November 2017 (1) October 2017 (2) July 2017 (4) April 2017 (1) February 2017 (1) January 2017 (1) December 2016 (1) November 2016 (1) October 2016 (1) September 2016 (2) June 2016 (1) May 2016 (1) April 2016 (1) February 2016 (3) January 2016 (1) December 2015 (2) November 2015 (1) October 2015 (2) September 2015 (2) August 2015 (2) July 2015 (1) June 2015 (1) April 2015 (1) March 2015 (1) February 2015 (2) January 2015 (6) December 2014 (2) October 2014 (1) September 2014 (3) August 2014 (3) June 2014 (2) May 2014 (5) April 2014 (3) February 2014 (1) January 2014 (2) December 2013 (1) April 2013 (1) December 2012 (2) July 2012 (2) April 2012 (2) March 2012 (2) December 2011 (1) November 2011 (3) October 2011 (4) September 2011 (5) August 2011 (3) May 2011 (2) April 2011 (1) March 2011 (2) November 2010 (2) August 2010 (1) June 2010 (1)...

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